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Medellín, Colombia

Medellín and surroundings

sunny 25 °C

We got into Medellin very early in the morning. We had booked two dorms in the place; however, they had made a mistake with the reservations and the dorms were fully booked. They offered a double room with en-suite bathroom for the same price! We couldn’t be happier with our spacious and comfy room, after a 6 hours overnight bus. Moreover, the hostel Casa Del Sol www.hostalcasadelsol.com was really cool, probably one of the best ones we have stayed in our whole trip. Friendly and very helpful staff, large common areas, fully equipped and new kitchen, ping-pong table, roof top area. We highly recommend it.
After leaving our things in the room, we went for breakfast, went back to the hostel, slept a little bit and decided to go into town to explore the city. I wouldn’t say Medellin is a must do in Colombia but it is a fine city to stroll around, with loads of shops and some interesting exhibitions to see. It is fun to walk around its plazas and do people watching; a funny one was a group of locals taking part of a strange betting game. Basically they had a put 10 buckets on the ground that people would put money on. Then they had a hamster (or similar to a hamster) that they let go on the ground about 10 meters away from these buckets. The hamster thingy would then go into one of these buckets and the people who had put money on that bucket won. What a crazy game!
Medellin would definitely be a good place to live: it has the best weather in Colombia: mild temperatures and mostly sunny everyday makes it a pleasant place to live. And on top of that, Medellin has friendly people and loads of culture.
We also went to El Poblado, which is known as the “gringo” area, where all the hostels are. Loads of cheesy and expensive bars are the offer in the area. The people here are pretty shallow: posh Colombians, silicon everywhere and old men with the most gorgeous and young women. We really disliked the area; luckily, we were staying in a separate area far out from there.
The next day we visited an interactive museum where you could experience earthquake movements, sense tectonic plaques moving, learn about the origin of the Earth, be part of a science experiment. It was fantastic…
We also met a really friendly group of Swedes who we run into later, when we went visiting a peculiar rock formation El Peñol outside Medellin. We went all five together: they were really young but very mindful and sensible guys. We really had fun with them. And the rock was awesome: we went up its 600 stairs to see the view of the area: the area was full of gorgeous lakes of what it looked like a peninsula. It actually looked a lot like Sweden. The granite rock was an outstanding formation unique in the surrounding area.
That same day we were off to Santa Marta. The 13 hours trip turned up to be a 22 hour trip: we got stuck in the highway for 5 hours in the middle of the night because a bridge fell off; it tore down from the heavy rain that had been affecting Colombia for the last three months or so. This bridge connected the cities in the coast with inland, so we had to take a detour that delayed the trip 3 extra hours. After an exhausting bus ride we were in Taranga, Santa Marta.
Fancy wallpaper In hostel Casa del Sol, Medellin

Fancy wallpaper In hostel Casa del Sol, Medellin

Who is fastest: an elephant or me...or the turle

Who is fastest: an elephant or me...or the turle

Towards El Peñol, crazy rock formation

Towards El Peñol, crazy rock formation

Granite rock, El Peñol

Granite rock, El Peñol

Us and the cool landscape of El Peñol

Us and the cool landscape of El Peñol

Cool landscape from the top of the rock

Cool landscape from the top of the rock

Henrik messing about for the photo

Henrik messing about for the photo

View of one of the lakes, El Peñol, Medellín

View of one of the lakes, El Peñol, Medellín

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Posted by hmontonen 07:18 Archived in Colombia

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